Going gluten free

On the palindromic rheumatism facebook group, there are often posts from people wondering whether there is any link between diet and their symptoms. I’ve written about this before, and have never really been convinced that my flare ups relate to any particular food or food groups. I tried keeping a food diary, but there was no conclusive results in two months and so I just stopped doing it as it got really tedious! Eighteen months ago I drastically cut down on sugar, in the hope that it could be a culprit. It sort of helped my energy levels a little, but I didn’t think that it was a cause of any flares.

Yet on the facebook group, a number of people DO seem to feel that some foods do trigger their symptoms, though the foods themselves are not the same for everyone. Variously, they single out gluten, sugar, MSG, artificial sweeteners, tomatoes, and processed foods. Meanwhile, plenty of well-meaning people continue to advise me to give up various different foods, convinced that they are the cause of arthritic symptoms.  There also seem to be lots of people online talking about following an alkaline diet or the ‘paleo’ diet. I’m not so sure myself. The paleo diet seems to be very meat-based and as I haven’t eaten meat since 1990, it’s not something that appeals!

One of the things that comes up a LOT when people talk about diet and arthritis is avoiding gluten. But I’ve been quite resistant to giving it up. After all, gluten is in lots of foods, and I do really love bread and toast and so I’ve never really given it a go. I already avoid sugar, meat, various dairy products and follow a low-GI diet as much as I can. Do I really want to cut out another food group?

And yet…

When I was at the Apples & Pears fitness bootcamp, my symptoms completely disappeared. Even the flares that had been ‘stuck’ in joints for weeks and months went away. Part of me is convinced that this is down to the exercise getting rid of all the stress that had built up in my body after a bereavement and having builders in the house. But another part of me also wonders – could it be down to the fact that my gluten intake during that week was very low? Or could it be a combination of the two?

Even more confusingly, when I got home, I flared up within 24 hours of getting back. It could have be the stress of being back in a builder-infested house. Or, it could have been the slices of toast that I had the evening I arrived home.  So, I decided to cut out gluten and see what happens.

It’s been ten days now since those slices of toast. The returning home flare-up disappeared soon afterwards, and I have had quite a few more pain-free days with only very mild flare ups in my fingers after a very long day at work. It’s too early to draw any real conclusions. I’m going to have to stick with it for a couple of months and monitor symptoms during that time. If I haven’t flared by then, I’ll try reintroducing gluten and see whether it triggers anything.

Justin, my partner, reflected that this whole process was a win/win situation. Either gluten triggers my symptoms – in which case, I can control (to some extent) my condition by avoiding it. OR it doesn’t. In which case I can have toast and bread again! 🙂 Either way I win.

I am using rheumatrack, an app, to monitor my symptoms, so I will have something concrete to refer to at the end of the experiment.

So far, I haven’t found it too tricky, but I imagine it will get harder as time goes on. I know I’m going to have to be more prepared with my lunches and bringing food to events with me. Any suggestions, advice or good gluten free recipes welcome!

I promise to report back.

 

 

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3 responses to “Going gluten free

  1. i have gone gluten free for my ibs rather than my pr but it has had a beneficial effect on both. i haven’t had a bad flare for ages and thinking about it no really bad fatigue- you know the sort!
    asda or m&s spaghetti is best and some asdas do a great gf flatbread and sainsburys are quite good for stuff.
    When i eat out i usually google where i’m going and look on their website first – lots of chains have gf marked on their menus now.I’ve a great choc brownie recipe 🙂

  2. Have you any good news to report on your experiment?

    • I am planning on writing an update VERY soon about this. In short, I thought it was working cos I was practically pain and fatigue free for ages, but now the flares have returned even though I have still not gone back to eating gluten…. it’s difficult to know whether that period was a coincidence or not. Gluten may still be a trigger, but giving it up isn’t the cure-all that I hoped for.

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